Cadets in servitude and human rights

It tells a lot about values in Manila’s manning sector. Maritime cadets are made to work as unpaid office help or flunkeys, and people see nothing wrong with it. Yet, one has to be callous and ignorant not to see that the serve-for-sail practice demeans cadets and is a violation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Total Share: 2001100

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Celebrating old salts in paintings

On the great and sometimes crazy stage we call shipping, few players are more interesting than the old salts, the lobos de mar—men who cut their teeth on boats and know, as did Polish-British novelist and sea captain Joseph Conrad, that “there is nothing more enticing, disenchanting, and enslaving than the life at sea.” The following six iconic paintings shine […]

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Radical fix for Filipino maritime schools

Is raising the standard of Philippine maritime education a quixotic goal? Maybe so. The glut of maritime schools continues, and we hear muffled complaints from school owners about how government inspections are carried out. One should hope, nonetheless, that the system is not beyond redemption. Listed below are some radical solutions to fix the underlying problems. Total Share: 9421101

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Lessons from 7 years of blogging

Marine Café Blog silently marked its seventh anniversary last 25th of August whilst I was on extended leave from my normal activities. Seven years is not a long span, but it has taught me a few lessons. The first is that some maritime institutions are considered sacrosanct, and woe to the writer who dares question them. Total Share: 1100000

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