‘Thanksgiving Day at Sea’: An old poem for modern times

‘Thanksgiving Day at Sea’: An old poem for modern times

I ran across a poem which I thought would be good to share with readers of Marine Café Blog, especially those who work at sea. ‘Thanksgiving Day at Sea’ was written by L. H. Sigourney (1791—1865), an American poet and schoolteacher. The poem is included in her 1850 book, Poems for the Sea. Although not particularly striking, it is worth reading because of its message and the prayer-like sincerity of the words.

A serving of art to celebrate U.S. Thanksgiving Day

A serving of art to celebrate U.S. Thanksgiving Day

Marine Café Blog is happy to greet its American readers a cordial Thanksgiving Day. In celebration of this event, which is observed every fourth Thursday of November in the United States, I’d like to share the following works of art from the 19th century. I hope that this limited selection will open for all the blog’s readers a window to American history and culture.

Love, sex and the seafarer: ‘The human element’ in art

Love, sex and the seafarer: ‘The human element’ in art

I have always objected to the use of the term “the human element” to refer to seafarers. It not only sounds as cold as the periodic table of elements invented by the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev. More important, it objectifies seafarers and detracts from their humanity. The following works of art show just how human they are — no less driven by love and libido than the maritime bureaucrats and pedants who label them “the human element”.

A major misconception about EMSA audits still persists

A major misconception about EMSA audits still persists

It has been 17 years since the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) made its inspection visit to Turkey — the first of many it would conduct to verify compliace with the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW). Yet, many still have a foggy idea about the real nature and goal of these inspections.

A delightful serving of Claude Monet’s marine drawings

A delightful serving of Claude Monet’s marine drawings

Marine Café Blog spotlights the marine drawings of Claude Monet in celebration of his 182nd birth anniversary.

Monet, a leading light of French Impressionism, was born in Paris on 14 November 1840. His countless oil paintings continue to bedazzle the world long after he passed away on 5 December 1926. Unfortunately, they have also diverted attention away from an important part of Monet’s creative output: his drawings.

Judith in den Bosch: Dreams and metaphors on water

Judith in den Bosch: Dreams and metaphors on water

The photographic art of Judith in den Bosch from the Netherlands is hard to ignore.

The images she captures and digitally transforms on her mobile phone are often surrealistic. Sometimes they can be described as mystical. Always, the pictures usher the viewer into the photogapher’s inner world of moods and feelings. Although distinct from the real world, they are, at the same time, a reflection of it.

Timeless quotes about charity for today’s shipping world

Timeless quotes about charity for today’s shipping world

Charity is a great thing. It uplifts the human spirit and acts as an antidote to greed. Unfortunately, charity in the shipping world has descended to the level of propaganda, corporate almsgiving and media spectacle. The maritime charities drum up a particular issue (e.g., depression at sea), and large corporations, their conscience pricked, donate money to the cause. The whole cycle is attended by publicity.

If you like this site buy me a coffee

New in The Nautical Shop


Personalized Gifts

Hooded Sweatshirts


Laptop/Phone Sleeves

Nautical Shirts

Nautical Mugs

Pin It on Pinterest