Five things most undervalued in the shipping world

Five things most undervalued in the shipping world

People reveal their character as much by the things they value as by those that they don’t. The same applies to the shipping world. I have listed down five top things or persons which, in my view, have not received the importance or appreciation they deserve or have been neglected somehow by maritime folks, including journalists. On the other hand, there are certain things which are held very dear by those engaged in maritime business and commerce. I have listed those as well.

Stronger than tea: Marine paintings by six British women

Stronger than tea: Marine paintings by six British women

I am always pleasantly surprised whenever I come across a marine painting by a woman from the 19th or early 20th century. In those days the world of European art was dominated by men. And only few women, such as Leontine von Littrow, who managed to break into this male enclave had a significant ouput of marine art. This makes such works by female artists even more interesting and important.

10 uplifting quotes about faith for maritime folks

10 uplifting quotes about faith for maritime folks

There is faith of the religious sort. There is also faith in the general sense — that is, immense trust or confidence in something or someone. It could be anything: a system, a particular individual, humankind, or life itself. Either way, faith is essential. A person without it is like a rudderless, anchorless ship drifting at sea.

Some blunt questions for the IMO on maritime women

Some blunt questions for the IMO on maritime women

So the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has declared the 18th of May as “International Day for Women in Maritime 2022”. Well and good. Women deserve all the support they can get in a male-dominated shipping world. The question, however, arises: where is the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the celebration of this event?

Fragments of life and maritime history in old postcards

Fragments of life and maritime history in old postcards

How many still send postcards by mail? People now use email and social media to send messages from near and far. Gone are the days when one would handwrite a greeting on a postcard, lick a stamp to paste onto it, and dispatch the card by mail to a friend or loved one. Come and have a nostalgic look at the lost age of postcards:

Ida Lewis: Gutsy lighthouse keeper who saved lives at sea

Ida Lewis: Gutsy lighthouse keeper who saved lives at sea

This is the first of Marine Café Blog’s new series of articles about women who have made an impact on society and maritime history. Their exemplary deeds, I trust, will serve to inspire women in the 21st century no matter their station in life. — BU

Ida Lewis (1842 – 1911) was a relatively small woman. According to some accounts, she was only five feet, two inches talll and weighed 115 lbs. But she was larger than life. During the years that she lived and worked at Lime Rock Lighthouse in Newport, Rhode Island, she saved 18 people from drowning. She did not keep a record of her rescues, and the figure is thought to be as high as 25.

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