Modern eyes have been spoiled by colours. Who would still want to use a mobile phone with a black & white screen? Even old films are being colourised to suit the contemporary viewer. Seashells, however, are just as captivating in a monochrome print or drawing as they are in an oil painting. Undistracted by colour, one can admire even more their wonderful contours and textures.

I believe that one should look at seashells like a child and be filled with wonder at the Great Design of which shells are just one manifestation.

— BU, “Nautilus shell: Behold the beauty and Nature’s math”, 23 July 2020 

Shell (Conus imperialis), 1644–1652
Etching
Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian, 1607–1677)
Courtesy of Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Shell (Nautilus pompilius), 1644–1652
Etching
Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian, 1607–1677)
Courtesy of Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Shell (Pacific Calliostoma)
Illustration in American Seashells by R. Tucker Abbott, M.S., published 1954

Crown Conch
Illustration in American Seashells by R. Tucker Abbott, M.S., published 1954

Shell: Hebrew Volute (Voluta ebraea L), c. 1646
Etching
Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian, 1607–1677)
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Shell, 1650
Etching / drypoint / burin
Rembrandt van Rijn (Dutch, 1606–1669)
Courtesy of Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The Shell (Conus marmoreus), 1650
Etching / engraving / drypoint
Rembrandt van Rijn (Dutch, 1606–1669)
Courtesy of Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

~ Barista Uno

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