Don’t bet on it. The Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act 2010, due to become US law very shortly, requires tighter security measures on cruise ships carrying more than 250 passengers on international voyages which call at any US port. Not least important: crimes on the high seas should be reported to the FBI and the US Coast Guard. The new protocol will impact on shipboard routines, ship design, crew training and perhaps the whole cruise ship environment.

Lawrence W. Kaye and Andre M. Picciurro of Kaye, Rose & Partners have neatly summarised the forthcoming changes in the latest issue of US Bodily Injury News, Published by Thomas Miller (Americas) on behalf of the UK P&I Club:

Design and construction standards.  All cruise ships must meet certain design and construction standards within 18 months of enactment. Rails must be 42 inches above the cabin deck, 2.5 inches more than the US Coast Guard’s existing requirement. Passenger and crew cabin doors must have a “means of visual identification,” such as peepholes. Ships must be equipped with technology, if available, to detect persons fallen overboard, and with a video surveillance system to document crimes. In certain high risk areas, ships must have acoustic hailing and warning devices. All new-build cruise ships must provide latches and time-sensitive key technology on all passenger and crew cabin doors.

Cruise ships must provide passengers and crew with a list of all US embassies and consulates in the countries they visit. Congress is discussing whether ships should provide all passengers with lists of medical and security personnel and law enforcement agencies in the jurisdictions visited.

Sexual assaults.  For treating and examining persons alleging sexual assault, the Act requires cruise ships to have on board medications to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (e.g., anti-retroviral medications); equipment and materials for performing post-assault examinations; and doctors and/or registered nurses with appropriate experience/certification in emergency medicine.

Cruise lines should make available to the patient a confidential examination report, with cruise ship personnel only entitled to see findings which will assist the master or colleague to comply with safety and reporting laws; contact information for law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, US embassies and consulates; a third party victim advocacy hotline; and private telephone and computer access to contact law enforcement, attorneys or support services. Ships must implement regulations about which crew members have access to passenger staterooms and when.

Log book and crime reporting. Ships must keep a log book (electronic or otherwise), detailing complaints of homicide, suspicious death, missing US nationals, kidnapping, assault with serious bodily injury, sexual assault, firing or tampering with the vessel, and theft of property over $1,000.  Ships must notify the nearest FBI office and send a report to the Secretary of Transportation about all such crimes (except for theft of property less than $10,000) in specific circumstances. These include where a vessel owner, regardless of his ship’s flag, is a US citizen; where an incident occurs within US territorial waters or on the high seas but involving a US national, whether victim or perpetrator; and where a US national is involved if a voyage embarks or disembarks passengers in the US, regardless of where the incident occurred.

The Transportation Secretary will maintain a public website to keep track of all such reported crimes for each cruise line whose own websites must provide a link to the Secretary’s.

Crew training. The Transportation Secretary is obliged to develop training standards and curricula for certification of passenger vessel security personnel, focusing “on the appropriate methods for prevention, detection, evidence preservation, and reporting of criminal activities in the international maritime environment” within one year of enactment. Two years after such standards and curricula are established, cruise ships may only enter US ports if they have at least one certificated crew member on board.

The Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act was spurred on by a 2006 incident in which an American lady was sexually assaulted aboard a Royal Caribbean cruiseship. In fact, similar crimes and cases of missing persons have been fairly common as evidenced by the existence of the International Cruise Victims Association. The new legislation is as much an unmasking of the ugly side of the cruise industry as a bold attempt to correct the problems. It should gladden not only the passengers but the cruise ship operators themselves. ~Barista Uno

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest updates from Marine Cafe Blog

You have Successfully Subscribed!